Session 178: CJ9 -> Understanding Policy and Punitiveness Across Contexts
Time: 9:30AM to 11:00 AM on Thursday, November 18
Place: Belmont Three
Session Chair: Anna K. King, University of Cambridge
Understanding the Punitive (and Non-Punitive) Public
by: Anna K. King, University of Cambridge (Corresponding)
Shadd Maruna, University of Cambridge
Personal Concepts About "Crime and Punishment" -- Results of a Qualitative Interview Analysis
by: Harald Kania, Max-Planck-Institute (Corresponding)
Joachim Obergfell-Fuchs, Max-Planck-Institute for Criminal Law
Helmut Kury, Max-Planck-Institute
The Myth of Punitiveness
by: Roger Matthews, Middlesex University (Corresponding)
Increased "Punitivity" -- Only a Consequence of a Harsher Punishment of Sex Offenders?
by: Joachim Obergfell-Fuchs, Max-Planck-Institute for Criminal Law (Corresponding)
Harald Kania, Max-Planck-Institute
Helmut Kury, Max-Planck-Institute
What Can Europeans Learn From American Criminology? The Powers and Liabilities of Policy Transfer in Crime Control
by: Kevin Stenson, Buckinghamshire Chilterns University Coll (Corresponding)

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Updated 05/20/2006