Estimate of the Number of Nonfatal Injuries From Physical Assaults Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments, United States, 2000-01

Thomas R. Simon, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Joseph L. Annest, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Patricia Holmgreen, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Eben M. Ingram, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Reshma R. Mahendra, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
James A. Mercy, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Linda E. Saltzman, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Monica H. Swahn, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

ABSTRACT
The NEISS All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) provides the data necessary to calculate national estimates for recent patterns in nonfatal assault-related injuries treated in ED's. This presentation will provide national, annualized, weighted estimates of physical assault-related injuries by sex, age, race/ethnicity, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, primary body part injured, and outcome. These nonfatal injuries were disproportionately seen among males, adolescents and young adults, and particularly black males. Most of the injuries were contusions, lacerations, or fractures and relatively few resulted in admission to the hospital. By comparing rates of ED visits for nonfatal physical assault-related injuries to 1999 homicide rates from the National Vital Statistics System data, we estimate that for every homicide there were 94 people treated in ED's in the U.S. Gender and race differences in rate ratios for fatal and nonfatal assaults will be described. The utility of the NEISS-AIP data for estimating the magnitude and characteristics of assault-related injuries and for monitoring trends, and facilitating additional research will be discussed.

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Updated 05/20/2006